You are here

SNAPPING BACK: Saltwater crocodiles back from the brink

21 September 2017

Saltwater crocodile, Roe River (Tim Willing)

For many people, a primeval fear of large carnivores clouds their ability to see how top-order predators struggle to survive on a planet dominated by an ever-intrusive human population. Lions, tigers, wolves, bears, sharks and crocodiles have all suffered extensive population losses due to the proximity of their habitats to cities and towns. Today, Australia has sophisticated nature management capabilities supported by appropriate legislation and enforcement. However these capabilities were not present when the saltwater crocodile was hunted to the brink of extinction between 1950 and 1970. It was only after a national ban on hunting crocodiles was put in place around 1970 that crocodiles were able to begin a slow process of recovery which continues to this day. FULL STORY

This article appears in the Spring 2017 issue of LANDSCOPE, published by the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions. For more information, and to order a copy of the magazine or purchase a subscription, visit shop.dpaw.wa.gov.au.

 

Category: 
Kimberley Marine Research Program