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Social Values

Description: 

Social values and aspirations for coastal waters of the Western Kimberley

Other Details: 

Kimberley Marine Research Program: Project 2.1.2
Location: See Geographic range below
Project Leader: Sue Moore, Murdoch University
Project contact: Halina Kobryn, Murdoch University
Telephone: 9360 2411
Email: H.Kobryn@murdoch.edu.au

Final Report

Human values and aspirations for coastal waters of the Kimberley_WAMSI KMRP project 2.1.2 Report_Moore et al 2016_Final

Final Report  Project Summary
What’s important to visitors at Port Smith,
Eighty Mile Beach, Kimberley? (2 page flyer)

How do people value the Kimberley coast? (2 page flyer)

 

Aims

  1. Describing and analyzing the social values of people associated with the coastal waters of the western Kimberley, especially Indigenous community members.
  2. Mapping these values so they can be included in decision making that relies on mapping and spatially‐based decisions.
  3. Identifying and analysing peoples’ aspirations regarding possible futures for the western Kimberley coastline.

Methods

  • Approximately 160 face‐to‐face interviews with people in the Kimberley and Perth in 2013, to explore peoples’ associations with these coastal waters, values, motivations, perceptions and management preferences. Interviews will be sought with local residents (Indigenous and nonindigenous), tourists, the tourism industry, commercial and recreational fishing interests, protected area managers and other government agencies, aquaculture, pearling, mining, port facilities, oil and gas, and non‐government environmental organisations.
  • Workshops in the Kimberley and Perth in 2014 to map peoples’ social values and to gain an understanding of peoples’ aspirations regarding possible futures for this coastline. One research possibility currently being explored is combining cultural mapping methods, as used in anthropology, with public participation geographic information system (PP GIS) techniques that are rapidly developing and are being widely applied in natural resource management.
  • Web‐based survey to explore and document peoples’ preferences for future management of the western Kimberley coastline.
  • Office‐based analysis of internet blogs and posted photos to help understand the social values of those geographically remote from the coastline of the western Kimberley but with a strong interest in it.
  • Collaboration/partnership with Indigenous communities in the Kimberley to see if the new PP GIS techniques are useful and if so, assist in providing training.

Geographic range

  • West Kimberley coast from Eighty Mile Beach to Cape Londonderry.
  • Perth.
  • Web‐based survey and analyses, so independent of the physical location of respondents.

Project duration: 2013 – 2015

The preliminary fieldwork schedule for the Kimberley for 2013 follows. The parts involving Indigenous communities will be refined through consultation. However, please note that bookings for accommodation, flights and car hire have already been made in an effort to keep costs down in a very expensive part of the world to work.

Outcomes

  • Social information for policy development, planning and management
  • Techniques for accessing and providing this social information, including potentially building capacity among Indigenous rangers in using PP GIS.

Longer term goals beyond the life of the project

To have developed methods that are easy and simple to use (by communities and scientists) for accessing, describing and mapping social values so they can be better included in decision‐making and management. Being able to show these values on maps is very important as such spatial information is widely used in decision‐making.

Reports

Final Report:
Strickland-Munro, J., Moore, S., Kobryn, H. and Palmer, D. (2016) Human values and aspirations for coastal waters of the Kimberley.

Technical Report 1:

Strickland-Munro, J., Moore, S., Kobryn, H. and Palmer, D. (2015) Values and aspirations for coastal waters of the Kimberley: social values and participatory mapping using interviews. Technical Report. Kimberley Marine Research Program Node of the Western Australian Marine Science Institution.

Technical Report 2 (PPGIS):
Strickland-Munro, J., Kobryn, H., Brown, G., Pearce, J. and Moore, S.A. (2016). Human values and aspirations for coastal waters of the Kimberley: Social values and management preferences using Public Participation GIS. Technical Report. Kimberley Marine Research Program Node of the Western Australian Marine Science Institution, WAMSI, Perth, Western Australia.

Technical Report 3 (Choice experiment):
Spencer-Cotton A., Kragt M, Burton M (2016). Human values and aspirations for coastal waters of the Kimberley: Social values and management preferences using Choice Experiments. Technical Report. Kimberley Marine Science Program Node of the Western Australian Marine Science Institution.

Technical Report 4 (Port Smith visitor survey):
Strickland-Munro, J., Kobryn, H., Bayley, S., Moore, S. and Palmer, D. (2016). Human values and aspirations for coastal waters of the Kimberley: Port Smith (Purnturrpurnturr) visitor survey. Technical report. Kimberley Marine Research Program Node of the Western Australian Marine Science Institution, WAMSI, Perth, Western Australia.

Research Articles

Kobryn, H T, Brown, G, Munro, J, and Moore, SA (2017). Cultural ecosystem values of the Kimberley coastline: An empirical analysis with implications for coastal and marine policy. Ocean & Coastal Management. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2017.09.002

Munro J, Pearce J, Brown G, Kobryn H, Moore S.A. (2017) Identifying ‘public values’ for marine and coastal planning: Are residents and non-residents really so different? Ocean & Coastal Management 148, 9-21 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2017.07.016

Munro J, Kobryn H, Palmer D, Bayley S, and Moore S. A. (2017). Charting the coast: spatial planning for tourism using public participation GIS. Current Issues in Tourism doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2017.1346589

Moore, S.A., G. Brown, H. Kobryn and J. Strickland-Munro. 2017. Identifying conflict potential in a coastal and marine environment using participatory mapping. Journal of Environmental Management 197: 706-718. doi:http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.12.026

Strickland-Munro J, Kobryn H, Brown G, Moore S (2016) Valuing The Wild, Remote And Beautiful: Using Public Participation Gis To Inform Tourism Planning In The Kimberley, Western Australia International Journal of Sustainable Development and Planning DOI: 10.2495/SDP-V11-N3-355-364

Strickland-Munro J, Kobryn H, Brown G, Moore S (July 2016) Marine spatial planning for the future: Using Public Participation GIS (PPGIS) to inform the human dimension for large marine parks Marine Policy DOI: 10.1016/j.marpol.2016.07.011

Pearce J, Strickland-Munro J, Moore S (June 2016) What fosters awe-inspiring experiences in nature-based tourism destinations?, Journal of Sustainable Tourism, DOI: 10.1080/09669582.2016.1213270

Brown G, Strickland-Munro J, Kobryn H, Moore S (Dec 2015) Stakeholder analysis for marine conservation planning using public participation GIS Applied Geography DOI:10.1016/j.apgeog.2015.12.004

News

  1. Social values require careful consideration in land use planning (WAMSI Bulletin May 2017)
  2. Values on the Kimberley Coast (Science Network WA)
  3. Mapping public values and preferences for Marine Protected Areas (WAMSI)
  4. What is the Kimberley worth? (WAMSI)
  5. Valuing the Kimberley: social science informs planning for marine parks (WAMSI)
  6. Survey indicates strong support for Kimberley coast protection (Murdoch University)
     

Links

The following website shows the distribution of the more than 27,000 values and preferences mapped in the Kimberley region by study participants: www.landscapemap2.org/kimberley/mapviewer.ph

Presentations

  1. Science on the Broome Coast: What do people value about the Kimberley coast?
  2. Presentation by Jennifer Strickland Munroe, Alaya Spencer-Cotton, and Marit E Kragt - Valuing environmental management of the Kimberley coast: using PPGIS and choice experiments
  3. Jennifer Strickland-Munro presents at the WAMSI Research Conference 2015