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Ecological connectivity

Description: 

Ecological connectivity of Kimberley marine communities

Other Details: 

Kimberly Marine Research Program: Project 1.1.3
Location: Buccaneer Archipelago
Project Leader: Oliver Berry, CSIRO
Telephone: 9333-6584
Email:  oliver.berry@csiro.au

Final Reports*

  1. Connectivity_Executive Summary WAMSI KMRP Project 1.1.3_Berry et al 2017_FINAL
  2. Connectivity_ Synthesis Report WAMSI KMRP Project 1.1.3a_Richards et al 2017_FINAL
  3. Connectivity_Coral Report WAMSI KMRP Project 1.1.3.1_Underwood et al 2017_EXECUTIVE SUMMARY*
  4. Connectivity_Seagrass Report WAMSI KMRP Project 1.1.3.2_McMahon et al 2017_FINAL
  5. Connectivity_Trochus report WAMSI KMRP Project 1.1.3.3_Berry et al 2017_EXECUTIVE SUMMARY*
  6. Connectivity_Damselfish Report WAMSI KMRP Project 1.1.3.4a_Berry et al 2017_EXECUTIVE SUMMARY*
  7. Connectivity_Stripey Snapper Report WAMSI KMRP Project 1.1.3.4b_DiBattista et al 2017_FINAL
  8. Connectivity_Fish Otoliths Report WAMSI KMRP Project 1.1.3.4c_Hearne et al 2017 FINAL

Click here to download the combined report (8.4MB)

(*The details of some subreports are currently subject to a peer review journal publication process. For those reports an Executive Summary is listed here until embargo periods are lifted. For more information contact the author)

Project Summary

Aims

  • To sample species of seagrass, corals, molluscs and fish around Cygnet Bay.
  • To determine how far seeds of plants and the larvae of animals travel before settling and becoming established.
  • To determine whether populations of plants and animals in other bays, and parts of the Kimberley, will aid in the recovery of those around Cygnet Bay, if there are severe disturbances in Cygnet Bay (e.g. cyclone).

Proposed Methods

  • Consult with staff from Kimberley Marine Research Station, Indigenous Communities and other WAMSI projects to determine where and how to sample plants and animals of interest.
  • Collect species of seagrass, molluscs, corals and fish, inter-tidally and sub-tidally, from sites around Cygnet Bay.
  • Conduct genetic analyses of samples collected.

Project Duration: 2013-2016

Geographic Range

  • Sampling sites will be determined after consultation with local authorities. Indicative sampling around Cygnet Bay and King Sound area, and other areas throughout the Kimberley, where possible.

Outcomes

  • Understand the scales of connectivity among populations of organisms in the Kimberley.
  • Aid in the design of Marine Protected Areas by identifying areas that may supply new individuals to populations after they have been impacted by disturbances.
  • Build capacity amongst scientists, locals and Indigenous Rangers to ensure protection of the marine environment in the Kimberley.

Research Articles

Underwood J, Richards Z, K Miller, Puotinen ML, Gilmour JP (2018) Genetic signatures through space, time and multiple disturbances in a ubiquitous brooding coral. Molecular Ecology doi.org/10.1111/mec.14559

Hernawan U, Van Dijk K, Kendrick G, Feng M, Biffin E, Lavery P, McMahon K (2017) Historical processes and contemporary ocean currents drive genetic structure in the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Molecular Ecology DOI:10.1111/mec.13966

DiBattista J, Travers M, Moore G, Evans R, Newman S, Feng M, Moyle S, Gorton R, Saunders T, Berry O. (2017) Seascape genomics reveals fine-scale patterns of dispersal for a reef fish along the ecologically divergent coast of Northwestern Australia. Mol Ecol. 2017;00:118. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.14352

Z. T. Richards, M. J. O’Leary, The coralline algal cascades of Tallon Island (Jalan) fringing reef, NW Australia. Coral Reefs June 2015, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 595-595 First online: 04 February 2015 doi: 10.1007/s00338-015-1262-6

Presentations

Berry O et al. Going with the flow: genomic insights into ecological connectivity in the Kimberley. 2017 WAMSI Research Conference (audioPresentation slides

 

Kimberley Roadshow

Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) researcher Jim Underwood toured the Kimberley in November 2017, presenting and discussing the results of the WAMSI Ecological Connectivity project and other AIMS coral reef research with Indigenous groups and other locals. This is how the  roadshow unfolded:

 

9/11/2017

Presented WAMSI 1.1.3 project findings to the Kimberley Indigenous Saltwater Science Project (KISSP) working group.  

This working group involved Rangers and PBC (Prescribed Body Corporate) directors from Yawaru, Nyul Nyul and Bardi Jawi, Karajarri, Dambimagarri and Wunambal Gaambera groups, and they were particularly interested in understanding how the new knowledge created from our research can support management of Saltwater Country in the Kimberley. We were invited (from many projects) because we were a good example (among a handful of WAMSI research projects) of a project that developed good relationships with the indigenous rangers and TO’s.

Talk Title: Going with the flow: connections among fish, trochus, coral and seagrass mobs in the Kimberley.

 

10/11/2017

Presented WAMSI 1.1.3 project findings to Bardi Jawi Rangers at One Arm Point.  

This was an informal discussion that centred on how our findings could be incorporated into the Healthy Country Plans for the IPA (Indigenous Protected Areas) in Bardi Jawi country, and how we might continue to provide support for ongoing management including monitoring key indicators of coral reef health now that the WAMSI project is coming to an end.

 

13/11/2017

Presented to the West Kimberley Ranger group, where Nyul Nyul and Bardi Jawi, Karajarri gathered at One Arm Point with NGOs (Non Government Organisations) and researchers to progress cooperative management across the region.

Talk Title: Going with the flow: connections among fish, trochus, coral and seagrass mobs in the Kimberley.

 

14/11/2017

Presented to the One Arm Point (Ardyaloon) Community High School about coral bleaching, how the coral larvae seem to ride the tides like the old people on their mangrove rafts, and management for healthy reefs.

Talk Title: Bleaching and connections among coral (marnany) mobs in the Kimberley

 

15/11/2017

Presented alongside James Gilmour to the Science on the Broome Coast seminar series in Broome organised by the Roebuck Bay working group.

This was a public seminar series attended by about 60 local Broome residents. James and I presented on bleaching, connectivity and conservation of WA’s coral reefs. The organiser told us that a few people said it was the best presentation of the year J. I was also interviewed on local radio (Radio Goolarri) on the morning of 15/11/2017 to talk about our presentation in the evening.
Title: Going with the flow: connections among fish, trochus, coral and seagrass mobs in the Kimberley.

 


 

Sarah Hearne from Curtin University talks about her PhD research using a new research tool – otolith microchemistry to better understand the broadscale patterns of population connectivity and habitat use in the Stripey snapper. (Feb 2017) (Presentation Slides)

 

 

WAMSI Lunch and Learn Seminar - Going with the flow: genomic insights into ecological connectivity in the Kimberley (August 2016) (Audio only - MP3)  (Presentation slides)

WAMSI Research Conference 2015 Oliver Berry, CSIRO - Connectivity (Audio)  (Presentation slides)

 

Sarah Hearne, Alison Blyth, Jennifer McIlwain, Michael Travers, Richard Evans, Kate Trinajstic (2017) Connectivity of fishes from the Kimberley region, Western Australia, using otolith geochemistry. Australian Society of Fish Biology annual conference held in Albany, WA, 21-23 July 2017.

Oliver Berry, Michael Travers, Richard Evans, Glenn Moore, Ming Feng, Udhi Hernawan, Bernd Gruber (2017) Complex ocean currents promote adaptive diversification and lower dispersal in a tropical reef fish from north-western Australia. Australian Marine Science Association Annual Conference, Darwin, July 2- 7, 2017.

Joseph DiBattista, Michael Travers, Glenn Moore, Richard Evans, Stephen Newman, Ming Feng, Rebecca Gorton, Samuel Moyle, Thor Saunders, Oliver Berry (2017) Genomics reveals fine-scale patterns of dispersal for a reef fish along the ecologically significant coast of Northwestern Australia. Australian Marine Science Association Annual Conference, Darwin, July 2- 7, 2017.

Oliver Berry, Glenn Moore, Zoe Richards, Udhi Hernawan, Bernd Gruber, Michael Travers (2017) Genomic evidence for isolation of offshore and coastal populations of Trochus in the Kimberley. Australian Marine Science Association Annual Conference, Darwin, July 2- 7, 2017.

Oliver Berry, Jim Underwood, Kathryn McMahon, Zoe Richards, Mike Travers, Glenn Moore, Udhi Hernawan, Joey DiBattista, James Gilmour (2016 ) Ecological Connectivity of Kimberley Marine Communities: Lunch and Learn session, Department of Parks and Wildlife, Kensington.

Zoe Richards (2016) Some like it HOT! Hard coral diversity of the Kimberley, NW Australia. Presented to five research institutions in Japan (Fisheries Research Agency, Tokyo Institute of Technology; University of Miyazaki; Sesiko Marine Station; University of the Ryukyus) under a JSPS short term fellowship awarded to Dr Richards.

Zoe Richards (2016) High cryptic diversity, taxonomic uncertainty and the risk of silent extinctions in corals. International Society for Coral Reefs Symposium, Honolulu.

Jim Underwood (2016) Genomics of spawning corals in the Kimberley. AMSA snapchat

Oliver Berry, Jim Underwood, Kathryn McMahon, Zoe Richards, Mike Travers, Glenn Moore, Udhi Hernawan, Joey DiBattista, James Gilmour (2015) Genetic Connectivity in an Extreme Marine Environment. Society for Australian Systematic Biologists Annual Conference, Fremantle.

Oliver Berry, Jim Underwood, Kathryn McMahon, Zoe Richards, Mike Travers, Glenn Moore, Udhi Hernawan, James Gilmour (2015) Ecological Connectivity in the Kimberley. WAMSI Dredging and Kimberley Nodes Symposium, Library of Western Australia, Perth.

Jim Underwood, Zoe Richards, James Gilmour, Oliver Berry (2015) Genetic connectivity and cryptic diversity in corals of the Kimberley. Society for Australian Systematic Biologists Annual Conference, Fremantle.

Kathryn McMahon, Udhi Hernawan, Gary Kendrick, Korjent van Dijk, Paul Lavery, Oliver Berry, Mike Travers, Jim Underwood (2015). Genetic connectivity of the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the Kimberley and Pilbara. Australian Marine Sciences Association, Geelong, Australia.

Udhi Hernawan, Kathryn McMahon, Gary Kendrick, Korjent van Dijk, Paul Lavery (2015). Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation, Oregon, Portland, USA. So near, yet so far: Genetic connectivity of the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in tropical Australia.

Kathryn McMahon (2015). Molecular ecology of seagrasses: tools for conservation and management. University of Jogjakarta, Natural resources from local to global conference. 2015. Invited speaker.

Kathryn McMahon (2015). Management and conservation of valuable seagrass ecosystems. Indonesian Institute of Sciences.

Kathryn McMahon (2015). What we know about connections in seagrasses: Long-distance dispersal, millennial movements and emerging patterns in NW WA. ECU Research Week

Udhi Hernawan, Kathryn McMahon, Gary Kendrick, Korjent van Dijk, Paul Lavery (2015). Predictors of genetic structure in marine organisms in the Indo-Australian Archipelago: Generalisable patterns and a seagrass-case study. ECU Research Week.

Udhi Hernawan, Kathryn McMahon, Gary Kendrick, Korjent van Dijk, Paul Lavery. Genetic connectivity of a tropical seagrass in an extreme environment: It is not just going with the flow. ECU Postgraduate Symposium.

Udhi Hernawan, Kathryn McMahon, Gary Kendrick, Korjent van Dijk, Paul Lavery, Oliver Berry, Mike Travers, Jim Underwood (2015). Going with the Flow: Ecological Connectivity of the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in the Kimberley and North West Cape, Western Australia. WAMSI Kimberley Symposium.

News

Ecological connectivity in the Kimberley (CSIRO Blog)

Kimberley reef life considered on microscopic level (Science Network WA)

Going with the flow in the Kimberley (WAMSI News)

Secrets of the green sea turtle revealed (WAMSI news)

Click here to listen to Dr Oliver Berry talking about turtle nesting on ABC Kimberley